Last edited by Grodal
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Stratigraphy of the Columbia River group, north-central Oregon found in the catalog.

Stratigraphy of the Columbia River group, north-central Oregon

Robert S. Cockerham

Stratigraphy of the Columbia River group, north-central Oregon

by Robert S. Cockerham

  • 251 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Basalt -- Oregon -- Butte Creek region.,
  • Basalt -- Columbia River Valley (Or. and Wash.),
  • Geology, Stratigraphic.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Robert S. Cockerham.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 56 leaves :
    Number of Pages56
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13590388M

    Columbia River Basalts: Features of a Typical Flow. Features of a Typical Flow Typical joint features in the Roza Member of the Columbia River Flood Basalt based on the exposure at Banks Lake, Washington. From Self and others (). Perhaps the most characteristic feature of the Columbia River Flood Basalt Province is the similarity of individual lava flows. "Chapters examine Columbia River Basalt Group stratigraphy, update the nomenclature, revise basalt ages, and update the volume of basalt and areal extent of flows; discuss current ideas on the petrogenesis for the Columbia River Basalt Group; and address the tectonic and structural development of the Columbia River Flood Basalt province"--Provided by publisher.

    Walker, G. W., , Some comparisons of basalts ot southeast Oregon with those of the Columbia River Group: Proceedings Second Columbia River Basalt Symposium, p. , Some implications of Late Cenozoic volcanism so geothermal potential in the High Lava Plains of south-central Oregon: The Ore Bin, v. 36, no. 7, p. The Cascade Range began to uplift during the early Pleistocene era (two million to , years ago). Cutting through the uplifting mountains, the Columbia River created the Columbia River Gorge. The river and its drainage basin experienced some of the world's greatest known catastrophic floods toward the end of the last ice age.

    The Columbia River is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. The river rises in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, flows northwest and then south into the US state of Washington, then turns west to form most of the border between Washington and the state of Oregon before emptying into the Pacific Ocean. The river is 1, miles (2, km) long, and Etymology: Captain Robert Gray's ship, Columbia Rediviva. The group also studied the stratigraphy below the Holocene sediments, which included the Missoula Flood gravels of the Pleistocene and older river gravels of the Troutdale Formation. Below these layers were rocks such as Sandy River Mudstone and Columbia River Basalt. Peterson’s group generated isopach maps of the river channel.


Share this book
You might also like
This day at 12 oclock the President of the United States communicated, by Mr. Coles his secretary, the following message to both Houses of Congress

This day at 12 oclock the President of the United States communicated, by Mr. Coles his secretary, the following message to both Houses of Congress

ROM

ROM

The psychology of romantic love

The psychology of romantic love

Sources & resources for the visual artist.

Sources & resources for the visual artist.

Special agent.

Special agent.

Josef Originals

Josef Originals

prophet child

prophet child

The 2000 Import and Export Market for Cutlery in Syrian Arab Republic

The 2000 Import and Export Market for Cutlery in Syrian Arab Republic

Designs for American gardens

Designs for American gardens

Reading for Difference/Instructors Manual

Reading for Difference/Instructors Manual

Stratigraphy of the Columbia River group, north-central Oregon by Robert S. Cockerham Download PDF EPUB FB2

Columbia river basalt Flows of Columbia River Basalt of middle Miocene age, at the southern margin of the Columbia Plateau, cap a prominent south-facing scarp in the northern part of the mapped area (pl. 1), and occur as scattered outliers farther south. GEOCHEMICAL AND PALEOMAGNETIC STRATIGRAPHY OF THE PICTURE GORGE AND YAKIMA BASALTS (COLUMBIA RIVER GROUP) IN CENTRAL OREGON [Nathan, Simon & Fruchter, Jonathan S] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

GEOCHEMICAL AND PALEOMAGNETIC STRATIGRAPHY OF THE PICTURE GORGE AND YAKIMA BASALTS (COLUMBIA RIVER GROUP) IN CENTRAL OREGONAuthor: Jonathan S Nathan, Simon & Fruchter. Columbia River Basalt Stratigraphy in the Pacific Northwest. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) consists of a thick sequence of Miocene flood basalt that covered northern Oregon, eastern Washington, and western Idaho between 17 and 6 million years ago (Location Map).

It is an important regional aquifer system, and, in its folded and faulted flows, it records the late Cenozoic structural. The Picture Gorge Basalt Subgroup was mapped over an area of 1, km 2 in the John Day Basin in north-central Oregon.

Lateral continuity of the Twickenham, Monument Mountain, and Dayville Basalts is demonstrated, and each is elevated to formation status within the Picture Gorge Basalt Subgroup of the Columbia River Basalt Group.

Columbia River Basalt Stratigraphy in the Pacific Northwest. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) consists of a thick sequence of Miocene flood basalt that covered northern Oregon, eastern Washington, and western Idaho between 17 and 6 million years ago.

Abstract. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) is one of the younger continental flood basalt provinces (– My B.P.). The flows form a high plateau in northwestern USA, covering large parts of the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho between the actively rising Cascade Range to the west and the main ranges of the Rocky Mountain system to the east (Fig.

1).Cited by: The Middle Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) is the youngest and smallest continental flood basalt province on Earth, covering overkm 2 of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho and having a volume ofkm 3.A well-established regional stratigraphic framework built upon seven formations, and using physical and compositional characteristics of the flows, has allowed the areal.

Stratigraphy and tectonics, Columbia River Flood-Basalt Pro vince fl d 1st pgs page signifi cant major, minor, or trace element v ariation (Reidel and. the Neogene stratigraphy of north-central Oregon (Farooqui and others, ), coupled with previously published data, has allowed us to raise the Dalles Formation to group status and to formally assign five discrete formations to the group.

The Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) covers a large part of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho and is one of the youngest and perhaps the best studied flood-basalt province on Earth. Flows belonging to the Imnaha Basalt, the oldest known in the Columbia River Basalt Group, are found in western Idaho and eastern Washington and Oregon.

The Picture Gorge and Prineville Basalt formations are limited to areas in central Oregon defining the southern extent of CRBG. The Grande Ronde Basalt comprises about 80% of the CRBG by volume and covers most of the area where the.

A list of best nonfiction and historical fiction books focused on the Columbia River Basin. Score A book’s total score is based on multiple factors, including the number of people who have voted for it and how highly those voters ranked the book.

GEOCHEMICAL AND PALEOMAGNETIC STRATIGRAPHY OF THE PICTURE GORGE AND YAKIMA BASALTS (COLUMBIA RIVER GROUP) IN CENTRAL OREGON [Simon & Fruchter, Jonathan S Nathan] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Jonathan S Nathan, Simon & Fruchter.

The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) hosts a regional aquifer system in portions of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho which is the primary, and in many cases the only, water supply for numerous communities, small water systems, individual homes, industry, and agriculture.

In much of the semi-arid Columbia Plateau, portions of the CRBG aquiferFile Size: 4MB. Ronde Basalt, Columbia River Basalt Group; stratigraphic descriptions and correlations in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, in Reidel, SP., and Hooper, P.R., eds., Volcanism and tectonism in the Columbia River flc«i-basalt province: Geological Society Of America Special paperp.

New stratigraphic nomenclature for units within the Columbia River Basalt Group is introduced to revise and expand that currently in use; it is based largely on sub­ divisions made informally by T.

Wright, M. Grolier, and D. Swanson in Cited by: Columbia River Basalt Group stratigraphy 54 Columbia River basalt overlying tuffs of the John Day 55 Formation Photomicrograph showing black glassy groundmass from 57 the entablature of the Columbia River basalt flow near Prineville Fine-grained, nonwelded ash-flow tuff with angular 64 inclusions of Clarno andesite.

Represents the western. Oregon Astoria Basin Columbia River Area of Fig. 1 Figure 1. Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) in western Oregon and Wash-ington (dark gray), showing area of fi eld trip.

Dotted line outlines Astoria Basin. Inset shows area of CRBG in the Pacifi c Northwest, source vents (dashed lines), and Yakima Fold belt structures (gray lines). Figure 2. The Columbia River Basalt Group covers an area of more thankm 2 with an estimated volume ofkm 3.

As the youngest continental flood-basalt province on Earth (– Ma), it is well preserved, with a coherent and detailed stratigraphy exposed in the deep canyonlands of eastern Oregon and southeastern by: 6. Index map of Columbia River Plateau 3 2.

Stratigraphy of the Columbia River Basalt Group 5 3. Location of linear vent systems, Yakima Basalt Subgroup 7 4. MgO variation diagrams, Yakima Basalt Subgroup 46 5. Thorium variation diagrams, Yakima Basalt Subgroup 58 6. Rare-earth-element data (chondrite normalized) for Yakima Basalt Subgroup 66 by:.

The Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) is the youngest and best preserved continental flood basalt province on Earth, linked in space and time with a compositionally diverse succession of volcanic rocks that partially record the apparent emergence and passage of the Yellowstone plume head through eastern Oregon during the late by: 2.The stratigraphy and structure of the Columbia River basalt group in the Salmon River area, Oregon, Martin S.

Burck PDF Stratigraphic and petrologic analysis of trends within the Spencer Formation sandstones: from Corvallis, Benton County, to Henry Hagg Lake, Yamhill and Washington counties, Oregon, Brent Joseph Cunderla."Chapters examine Columbia River Basalt Group stratigraphy, update the nomenclature, revise basalt ages, and update the volume of basalt and areal extent of flows; discuss current ideas on the petrogenesis for the Columbia River Basalt Group; and address the tectonic and structural development of the Columbia River Flood Basalt province"